Volume 7, Issue 2
Effect of Abaya Designs and Daily Wear Clothing on Thermal Comfort Measured with a Female Thermal Manikin

Salwa Tashkandi, Lijing Wang & Sinnappoo Kanesalingam

Journal of Fiber Bioengineering & Informatics, 7 (2014), pp. 285-295.

Published online: 2014-07

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  • Abstract

Multiple layers of clothing are known to increase thermal resistance and evaporative resistance. This study investigates the effect of wearing abaya, an Islamic outerwear stipulated for women, on thermal resistance performance assessed with a female thermal manikin. Tests were conducted at two climatic conditions. The first set was at 23 ° C and 50% RH as the dry condition and the second set was at 35 °C and 40% RH as the wet condition. Thermal resistance and evaporative resistance properties were measured by dressing a female thermal manikin in various ensembles of clothing within different types of abaya. The test results revealed that for all abaya combinations with daily wear, the manikin needed less heat to maintain the average skin temperature than with daily wear clothing alone. This study suggests that the abaya provided additional thermal and vapour resistance. Among the types of abaya evaluated, those worn on the head offered higher thermal resistance than those worn from the shoulder with tight sleeves. Marginal variations were also observed on the basis of the clothing worn under the abaya.

  • Keywords

Abaya Design Thermal Resistance Evaporative Resistance Thermal Manikin Clothing Comfort

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@Article{JFBI-7-285, author = {}, title = {Effect of Abaya Designs and Daily Wear Clothing on Thermal Comfort Measured with a Female Thermal Manikin}, journal = {Journal of Fiber Bioengineering and Informatics}, year = {2014}, volume = {7}, number = {2}, pages = {285--295}, abstract = {Multiple layers of clothing are known to increase thermal resistance and evaporative resistance. This study investigates the effect of wearing abaya, an Islamic outerwear stipulated for women, on thermal resistance performance assessed with a female thermal manikin. Tests were conducted at two climatic conditions. The first set was at 23 ° C and 50% RH as the dry condition and the second set was at 35 °C and 40% RH as the wet condition. Thermal resistance and evaporative resistance properties were measured by dressing a female thermal manikin in various ensembles of clothing within different types of abaya. The test results revealed that for all abaya combinations with daily wear, the manikin needed less heat to maintain the average skin temperature than with daily wear clothing alone. This study suggests that the abaya provided additional thermal and vapour resistance. Among the types of abaya evaluated, those worn on the head offered higher thermal resistance than those worn from the shoulder with tight sleeves. Marginal variations were also observed on the basis of the clothing worn under the abaya.}, issn = {2617-8699}, doi = {https://doi.org/10.3993/jfbi06201414}, url = {http://global-sci.org/intro/article_detail/jfbi/4785.html} }
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of Abaya Designs and Daily Wear Clothing on Thermal Comfort Measured with a Female Thermal Manikin JO - Journal of Fiber Bioengineering and Informatics VL - 2 SP - 285 EP - 295 PY - 2014 DA - 2014/07 SN - 7 DO - http://doi.org/10.3993/jfbi06201414 UR - https://global-sci.org/intro/article_detail/jfbi/4785.html KW - Abaya Design KW - Thermal Resistance KW - Evaporative Resistance KW - Thermal Manikin KW - Clothing Comfort AB - Multiple layers of clothing are known to increase thermal resistance and evaporative resistance. This study investigates the effect of wearing abaya, an Islamic outerwear stipulated for women, on thermal resistance performance assessed with a female thermal manikin. Tests were conducted at two climatic conditions. The first set was at 23 ° C and 50% RH as the dry condition and the second set was at 35 °C and 40% RH as the wet condition. Thermal resistance and evaporative resistance properties were measured by dressing a female thermal manikin in various ensembles of clothing within different types of abaya. The test results revealed that for all abaya combinations with daily wear, the manikin needed less heat to maintain the average skin temperature than with daily wear clothing alone. This study suggests that the abaya provided additional thermal and vapour resistance. Among the types of abaya evaluated, those worn on the head offered higher thermal resistance than those worn from the shoulder with tight sleeves. Marginal variations were also observed on the basis of the clothing worn under the abaya.
Salwa Tashkandi, Lijing Wang & Sinnappoo Kanesalingam. (2019). Effect of Abaya Designs and Daily Wear Clothing on Thermal Comfort Measured with a Female Thermal Manikin. Journal of Fiber Bioengineering and Informatics. 7 (2). 285-295. doi:10.3993/jfbi06201414
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